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New Haven: Young people are marching to have their voices heard

The city's peaceful protests have brought the community and city officials together. It has sparked conversations that were long overdue.

NEW HAVEN, Conn. — While there were no protests in New Haven Tuesday, leaders were discussing change.

The city's peaceful protests have brought the community and city officials together. It has sparked conversations that were long overdue.

"Many of the protesters are young people and they are looking for a different type of change," said New Haven Police Chief Tony Reyes. "They are looking to be heard."

Those voices are being heard in the Elm City.

"It’s important for me not to offer all the solutions but to listen to what many of the protesters are calling for," said Mayor Justin Elicker. 

On Friday along the steps of the New Haven Police department, Barbera Fair talked directly with Chief Reyes.

She believes conversations like that are the first step in progress that helped create a peaceful protest over the weekend.

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"They did so peacefully without any provocation from the police. That could not have happened if the man on top said allow that to happen," said Fair. 

Reverend Boise Kimber and the New Haven Clergy echoed those comments saying they are not angry with the police department for their actions. Instead they had a message to those that intend to bring violence to the city.

“There are many people who are marching who are not from the city and today we came to say you were not welcome in this city, to destruct the city, to tear down the city, to make statements at our Chief, to make statements at the Mayor. You are not welcome to do that," said Rev. Kimber.

Chief Reyes said in the governor's press conference that the city of New Haven may not have seen the violence that other cities around the country have seen but are monitoring the national trend.

"It’s important that we work to identify who these agitators are so we are taking proactive measures," said Chief Reyes. "We’re doing that on the state, local and federal levels"

The New Haven Clergy hope people channel some of that anger into action by voting.

They say if young people really want to enact change, they need to go out and vote.