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Victim’s family fights parole of murderer, says he’ll do it again

BROOKLYN, Conn. – A family fighting for justice for their sister who was murdered in the 1980s will get a chance to look into her killer’s eyes as h...
Louisa Scott

BROOKLYN, Conn. - A family fighting for justice for their sister who was murdered in the 1980s will get a chance to look into her killer's eyes as he faces possible parole.

Edward Francis Boyle will appear before the Board of Pardons and Paroles Friday at the Brooklyn Correctional Institution where he’s been incarcerated since 2004.

Boyle strangled Louisa Scott, 20, to death and threw her lifeless body in the Skungamaug River in Coventry in 1980.

“There’s nothing we do can bring our sister back,” her brother Timothy Scott said. “It’s been 36 years, but it’s something we live with on a day to day basis and every time he comes up for parole, we're re victimized.”

In 1983 Boyle was convicted of her death, as well as sexually assaulting four other women in years prior.

He served 16 years in prison and was released without court-ordered supervision in 1999.

Five years later Boyle was sent back to prison for sexually assaulting a 14-year-old girl.

“If he would have remained in prison that 14 year old girl wouldn't have lost her innocence,” Timothy said.

He was released on special parole a few years later but then ended up back behind bars for sending letters to a 14-year-old, violating the conditions of his parole.

“No woman in the state of Connecticut is safe if Ed Boyle is out on the streets,” Timothy said. “He will rape again, my biggest fear is that he will kill again.”

Boyle attempted to be released in 2011, but was unsuccessful and the Scott family is hoping for the same outcome.

“Deny his parole and have him remain incarcerated 'til the end of the term of his special parole, which would be 2024,” Timothy said. “That's the most time he can serve and we believe that’s the most appropriate thing for them to do.”

The family cannot speak at the hearing but has encouraged the public to write to the board to keep Boyle behind bars.

“We can put aside the emotional toll that it takes on us to do what we know what to be right for her memory and for other people,” he said.